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What is the 24-Point Numbering System

Whenever you read about backgammon on the Internet or in books you will encounter such things as 8/5 and 13/7*, 8/7 or bar/21. This piece of backgammon notation is called the 24-Point Numbering System. This is the notation system that is used by today's backgammon books.

The 24-Point Numbering System is a numbering system to represent all the action in a game of backgammon. It is used to depict the movement of backgammon checkers on the board.

The points of the backgammon board are numbered from one to twenty-four in the 24-Point Numbering System. The sequence is according to the view of the player who is supposed to make a move. You'll notice that each player during a game will reference a position on the backgammon board differently.

In the 24-Point Numbering System your one-point is going to be your opponent's 24-point and vice versa and your opponent's 20-point is your five-point. The movement of the checkers in this backgammon notation is from the higher number points to the lower number points.

When you see the word "bar" in the 24-Point Numbering System, it means that a checker is on the bar. And the word "off" in this notation system would mean that a backgammon checker has been borne off.

This is how you represent the moves in the 24-Point Numbering System. Let's take 13/7 as an example of checker movement in this numbering system. The 13 in the 24-Point Numbering System would denote movement of a checker from your 13-point to the seven-point.

There are times when you move a single checker twice in a turn thereby using both results on the dice on a single checker. If this is the case, you just need to write down where the checker came from and what point it lands on. For instance you roll a six-five and are able to use both numbers on a single backgammon checker in the opening roll. The movement of the backgammon checker is represented as 24/13 and not 24/18, 18/13.

You will also see asterisks and parentheses in the 24-Point Numbering System. An asterisk would mean that a backgammon checker was hit on the specified point. Let's say we have 24/21*, this would mean that your backgammon checker on the 24-point moved to 21-point and hit an enemy checker.

The parentheses in the 24-Point Numbering System denote double rolls. Let's say you roll a five-five and decide to move both back checkers to the 20-point you denote this as 24/20(2).

This is the current notation system that is used today to represent the action in a game of backgammon. The 24-Point Numbering System becomes easy after going through the system a few times.

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